An eclipse is the masking of a celestial body by another along an observer’s line of sight. From our perspective on Earth, there are two types of eclipses that occur. One is the lunar eclipse which is the blocking of the moon by the Earth’s shadow, and the other one is the solar eclipse which is the obstruction of the sun by the moon.

The lunar shadow is seen as a solar eclipse on Earth when the moon passes between the sun and Earth. But when Earth passes directly between the sun and moon, its shadow creates a lunar eclipse.

A lunar eclipse can only happen when the moon is opposite the sun in the sky, meaning, when there is a full moon. However, even if there’s a full moon every month, a lunar eclipse does not occur as often because the moon’s orbit is tilted five degrees from Earth’s orbit around the sun. It is only possible to occur every month without the tilt.

If the two eclipses would be compared, lunar eclipses are more likely be visible to us because Earth casts a much larger shadow on the moon during a lunar eclipse than the moon casts on Earth during a solar eclipse.

Many people all over the world are excited every time a solar or lunar eclipse would occur. Since they do not happen very often, people would really grab the chance to go out and wait just to observe one. If you’re one of those who love astronomical events like eclipses, then you’d find this list helpful. For you not to miss any of them, here is a schedule of the upcoming solar and lunar eclipses.

lunar eclipse

Schedule of Upcoming Eclipses in 2018

  • July 13, 2018 – Partial Solar Eclipse

This will be visible from very few locations on land such as in some parts of southern Australia, including Melbourne and Adelaide. But its majority will take place over the Indian and Pacific Oceans. It can also be seen from a very small part of northern Antarctica.

  • July 27-28, 2018 – Total Lunar Eclipse

This is the second total lunar eclipse of 2018. It will be visible in large parts of Asia, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. It will be the longest eclipse of the 21st century that will last for 103 minutes. On that day, the full moon is at its farthest from the Earth making it look smaller in the sky, which makes it a blood micro moon eclipse. It can be visible everywhere on the night side of the Earth if the sky is clear.

  • August 11, 2018 – Partial Solar Eclipse

This will be the most watched solar eclipse of 2018 because it will be visible from northern and eastern Europe, northern parts of North America, and some northern and western locations in Asia.

Schedule of Upcoming Eclipses in 2019

  • January 5-6, 2019 – Partial Solar Eclipse

This will be visible from locations in north Pacific and northeast Asia including Irkutsk in Russia, Taipei, Seoul, Beijing, and Tokyo.

  • January 20-21, 2019 – Total Lunar Eclipse

The total phase of this eclipse will be seen from North and South America, as well as in the western parts of Europe and Africa. Central and eastern Africa, Europe, and Asia on the other hand, will see a partial eclipse of the moon. The total duration of the eclipse is 5 hours and 2 minutes, with 2 hours and 15 minutes for the partial phases and 1 hour and 2 minutes for the full phase.

  • July 2, 2019 – Total Solar Eclipse

This will be visible from some parts of Argentina and Chile just before sunset. If the weather permits, some regions in the Pacific, as well as in South America will be able to see a partial solar eclipse.

  • July 16-17, 2019 – Partial Lunar Eclipse

This partial lunar eclipse will be visible from Europe and Asia, and as well as in some parts of Australia, Africa, South/East North America, South America, Pacific, Atlantic, Indian Ocean, and Antarctica. Its total duration will be 5 hours and 34 minutes, with 2 hours and 58 minutes for the partial eclipse.

  • December 26, 2019 – Annular Solar Eclipse

When the moon covers the sun’s center, this type of solar eclipse happens, leaving the sun’s visible outer edges which forms a ring of fire or which is called annulus, over the moon. It will be seen from most parts of Asia.

Schedule of Upcoming Eclipses in 2020

solar eclipse

  • January 10-11, 2020 – Penumbral Lunar Eclipse

This type of eclipse occurs when the sun, Earth, and the moon are imperfectly aligned. The Earth blocks the sun’s light from reaching the moon’s surface, it also covers part of the moon or all of it with the outer part of its shadow, which is known as the penumbra. This penumbral lunar eclipse will be visible from parts of Australia, Europe, China, and South Africa.

  • June 5 to 6, 2020 – Penumbral Lunar Eclipse

This penumbral lunar eclipse will be visible from most parts of Asia, Australia, Europe, and South Africa. Its total duration will be 3 hours and 18 minutes.

  • June 21, 2020 – Annular Solar Eclipse

This annular solar eclipse will be visible from most parts of Pakistan, and India, and as well as from Xiamen and Fujian, China, and Impfondo, Congo.

  • July 4-5, 2020 – Penumbral Lunar Eclipse

This penumbral lunar eclipse will be visible from most parts of Europe, South Africa, and North America. It will last for 2 hours and 45 minutes.

  • November 29-30, 2020 – Penumbral Lunar Eclipse

This penumbral lunar eclipse will be visible from most parts of Asia, Australia, and North America. Its total duration will be for 4 hours and 21 minutes.

  • December 14, 2020 – Total Solar Eclipse

This total solar eclipse will be quite difficult to see in most parts of the world. At least a part of it will be visible in Temuco and Villarica, Chile. On the other hand, South Africa, Pacific, Atlantic, Indian Ocean regions may see at least a partial eclipse on this day.

Schedule of Upcoming Eclipses in 2021

  • May 26, 2021 – Total Lunar Eclipse

This total lunar eclipse is visible from parts of Asia including Korea, China, Hong Kong, Japan, Taiwan, and Philippines. It will also be visible in some parts of Australia and North America. The total duration of this eclipse is 5 hours and 2 minutes.

  • June 10, 2021 – Annular Solar Eclipse

This annular solar eclipse will be seen mostly from Canada, Greenland, and Russia.

  • November 18-19, 2021 – Partial Lunar Eclipse

This partial lunar eclipse will last for 6 hours and 2 minutes with a partial eclipse of 3 hours and 28 minutes. It will be visible in Argentina, Venezuela, Canada, Australia, Mexico, and in some parts of Asia including China, Korea, and Taiwan.

  • December 4, 2021 – Total Solar Eclipse

At least part of this total solar eclipse will be visible from Orcadas, Antarctica while most parts of Africa and Australia will be able to view a partial eclipse.

Schedule of Upcoming Eclipses in 2022

  • April 30, 2022 – Partial Solar Eclipse

At least part of this eclipse will be visible from South/West South America, Pacific, Atlantic, and Antarctica.

  • May 15-16, 2022 – Total Lunar Eclipse

This eclipse will be visible in South and West Europe, South and West Asia, Africa, North America, and South America. It will last for 5 hours and 19 minutes.

  • October 25, 2022 – Partial Solar Eclipse

Most parts of Europe, South and West Asia, North and East Africa, and Atlantic regions will be able to view at least part of this eclipse.

  • November 8, 2022 – Total Lunar Eclipse

The regions that will be able to see this total lunar eclipse are North and East Europe, Asia, Australia, North America, and South America. It will last for 5 hours and 54 minutes.

Schedule of Upcoming Eclipses in 2023

  • April 20, 2023 – Total Solar Eclipse

The regions that will be seeing at least a partial eclipse on this day are South and East Asia, and Australia.

  • May 5-6, 2023 – Penumbral Lunar Eclipse

The regions that will be seeing at least a partial eclipse on this day are South and East Europe, Asia, Australia, and Africa. Its total duration will be 4 hours and 18 minutes.

  • October 14, 2023 – Annular Solar Eclipse

The regions that will be seeing at least a partial eclipse on this day are West Africa and North and South America.

  • October 28-29, 2023 – Partial Lunar Eclipse

At least a partial eclipse on these days will be seen from North and South America, Europe, Asia, Australia, and Africa. It will last up to 4 hours and 25 minutes.

Schedule of Upcoming Eclipses in 2024

  • March 24-25, 2024 – Penumbral Lunar Eclipse

This penumbral lunar eclipse will be visible from Canada, New York, New Zealand, Puerto Rico, Argentina, Brazil, and Venezuela. The total duration of this eclipse is 4 hours and 39 minutes.

  • April 8, 2024 – Total Solar Eclipse

At least part of the eclipse will be seen in Mexico, some parts of the USA, and in Canada.

  • September 17-18, 2024 – Partial Lunar Eclipse

Some parts of this partial lunar eclipse will be visible from Europe, Asia, Africa, and North and South America. Its will be for 4 hours and 6 minutes.

  • October 2, 2024 – Annular Solar Eclipse

This annular solar eclipse with be visible from Easter Island, Chile and from Puerto Deseado, Santa Cruz, Argentina.

  • October 17, 2024 – Almost Lunar Eclipse

An almost lunar eclipse is when the sun, Earth, and moon are closely aligned but there will be no lunar eclipse. We will not be able to see the Earth’s shadow on the moon during this eclipse.

Schedule of Upcoming Eclipses in 2025

  • March 13-14, 2025 – Total Lunar Eclipse

At least some parts of this total lunar eclipse will be visible from much of Europe, Asia, Australia, Africa, and North and South America. It will last for 6 hours and 3 minutes.

  • March 29, 2025 – Partial Solar Eclipse

This partial solar eclipse will be visible from Europe, North in Asia, North and West Africa, and much of North America.

  • September 7-8, 2025 – Total Lunar Eclipse

At least part of the total lunar eclipse will be visible from Africa, Asia, Europe, West in North America, and East in South America. Its total duration is 5 hours and 27 minutes.

  • September 21, 2025 – Partial Solar Eclipse

This partial solar eclipse will be visible from South Australia, Pacific, Atlantic, and Antarctica regions.

Schedule of Upcoming Eclipses in 2026

  • February 17, 2026 – Annular Solar Eclipse

This annular solar eclipse will only be fully visible from Concordia Station in Antarctica. But South and East Africa and South America might be able to see at least a partial eclipse on this day.

  • March 3, 2026 – Total Lunar Eclipse

Some parts of the eclipse will be seen in Europe, Asia, Australia, and North and South America regions. It will be for 5 hours and 39 minutes.

  • August 12, 2026 – Total Solar Eclipse

Part of the total solar eclipse will be visible from some parts of Greenland, Iceland, and most parts of Spain.

  • August 27-28, 2026 – Partial Lunar Eclipse

This partial lunar eclipse will be visible from much of Europe, South and West Asia, Africa, and North and South America. It will last for 5 hours and 38 minutes.

Schedule of Upcoming Eclipses in 2027

  • February 6, 2027 – Annular Solar Eclipse

This annular solar eclipse will be visible from most parts of Argentina, Uruguay, and Benin.

  • February 20-21, 2027 – Penumbral Lunar Eclipse

This penumbral lunar eclipse will be visible mostly from parts of Asia, North America, Europe, and Russia. Its total duration will be 4 hours and 1 minute.

  • August 2, 2027 – Total Solar Eclipse

This eclipse will be mostly seen from South and West Europe, Asia, Africa, and North America.

  • August 16-17, 2027 – Penumbral Lunar Eclipse

Some parts of this eclipse will be visible from West Europe, East Asia, Australia, Africa, and North and South America. It will be for 3 hours and 39 minutes.

Schedule of Upcoming Eclipses in 2028

  • January 11-12, 2028 – Partial Lunar Eclipse

This partial eclipse will be visible from Mexico, UK, Egypt, USA, and Russia. The duration of the eclipses is 4 hours and 11 minutes.

  • January 26, 2028 – Annular Solar Eclipse

This annual solar eclipse will be visible mostly in cities in Spain and Ecuador.

  • July 6-7, 2028 – Partial Lunar Eclipse

Europe, Asia, Australia, and South America are some regions that will see at least some parts of this eclipse. It will last for 5 hours and 11 minutes.

  • July 22, 2028 – Total Solar Eclipse

Part of this total solar eclipse will be seen mostly from parts of Australia and New Zealand.

  • December 31, 2028-January 1, 2029 – Total Lunar Eclipse

Some parts of the total lunar eclipse will be seen from Europe, Asia, Australia, Africa, and North America. It has a total duration of 5 hours and 36 minutes.

Remember that an eclipse never comes alone because a solar eclipse always occurs about two weeks before or after a lunar eclipse. There are usually two eclipses in a row but there are also times when there are three during the same eclipse season. We hope this schedule will help you not miss the chance of observing an eclipse.